4-Feb-15 9:45 AM  CST

Calcium Build Up in Blood Vessels may be Responsible for Kidney Stones

Kidney stones are fun for no one, and if you’ve ever had the pleasure of receiving one of these tiny little gems no further explanation is needed. Researchers have found that patients with reoccurring kidney stones have large deposits of calcium within their blood vessels. An increased level of calcium within the blood vessels also increases the risk for heart disease. Researchers are finding having increased levels of calcium within the blood vessels is much like having increased levels of cholesterol and consequently, high blood pressure.

According to research statistics, 10% of men and 7% of women will develop kidney stones at some point in there life. Researchers have found that those who experience chronic kidney stone development are also at an increased risk for kidney disease, heart disease, and high blood pressure. As the calcium builds in the blood vessels it begins to constrict the vein, much the same as it does with high levels of cholesterol.

Approximately 50% of cases linked to kidney stone development are inherited. However, researchers warn that kidney stones can develop from lifestyle habits as well. Dietary habits such as eating foods that contain too salt or potassium or having a diet in high in calcium may be contributing factors for the development of kidney stones. Lack of fluid intake, specifically, not drinking enough water, is also factors associated with the development of kidney stones. Health care professionals suggest that those who have a propensity for developing kidney stones or have a strong family history of kidney stone development maintain dietary and lifestyle habits that reduce the risk of stone development. Drinking plenty of water and seeking out diets that limit the amounts of calcium, potassium and salt will help to reduce the risk for kidney stone development.

 

 

References:

Black, R. (2015) “Some kidney stones might have build up in vessels: Study” MedicineNet.com, http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=186613, retrieved, 31. January 2015


For additional information on this article, please contact:
 
 
Source: Sandy Andrews  

Tendenci™ User Home © 2004 Tendenci™ software by Schipul - "The Web Marketing Company" | www.schipul.com